A Family Adventure


Tyson, Emilie & Isaac

Short hike up Pitcher Mountain

November 27, 2015
Emilie Phillips

On an unusually warm Black Friday, we hiked to the summit of Pitcher Mountain and flew a kite by the fire tower.

Isaac has grown too heavy for either Tyson or I to enjoy carrying him. So we are downsizing our hikes to short ones Isaac can walk himself. Tyson picked Pitcher Mountain which turned out to be just the right length. An hour drive for a one mile hike seems silly, but it’s an easy trail with good views surrounded by undeveloped forests.

Kite on the ground, again
Kite on the ground, again

Isaac carried his little parachute kite all the way to the top. There was plenty of wind driven by an approaching cold front. We found a sunny protected pocket for lunch and then pulled out the kite. Tyson tried flying it first. This is the third time we have flown the kite. The first time, my parents had trouble getting it to fly well. The next time, on the runway, we had a little better luck in steady winds. But up on top of Pitcher Mountain the winds were gusty and Tyson couldn’t get the kite to stay airborne. It would spin, then the parachute would collapse and the kite fall down. We tried trimming the strings different lengths. That changed the flight characteristics, but didn’t fix it. Isaac and another kid had fun watching Tyson try to fly the kite, but eventually he gave up. I unclipped the kite from the line, and Tyson rolled up the line. That’s when I noticed there was enough wind to fly the kite just holding onto the bridle. Isaac was shy of the kite at first, but when I bored of it, he decided to try.

He loved it. It didn’t fly any better than on the long string, but it was really easy for him to yank it back into the air after it fell. Whenever the wind blew hard, he giggled gleefully as the kite tried to pull him off his feet. He kept flying it for a long while. A great first experience flying a kite.

20151127-121211-028-PitcherMtn

Then we continued down the other side of the mountain. The trail starts in an expanse of head-high bushes. The other times we have visited in LINKS late fall or early winter, the bushes had dried dark berries. We guessed they were bluberries. This time, maybe due to the warm weather, the berries hadn’t all dried out yet. We found they are actually red berries of some sort.

Total distance 1 mile. Two lunch stops.

All Photos